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Monday, March 30, 2015

Healthy Stress Management to Heal & Prevent Type 2 Diabetes



Type 2 Diabetes has become a global epidemic, and while it may seem puzzling to see such massive increases in one disease category it isn't such a puzzle once you understand Type 2 Diabetes is a Lifestyle disease and the Western lifestyle is the perfect breeding ground for just such a health problem.  A lifestyle disease is one that is directly linked to lifestyle choices including what you eat, how much you exercise, what toxins you are exposed to and your stress levels. The Western lifestyle is the perfect breeding ground for Type 2 diabetes because of the way we eat (To lean more about how to Eat to Heal & prevent Diabetes click here), how toxic our environment, products and foods have become, how little we move these days and how much stress is normal in every day life. Stress plays a HUGE factor in the development and worsening of Type 2 Diabetes and most of us would say we live a fairly stressful lifestyle. 

How Stress Creates and Makes Type 2 Diabetes Worse

Stress is a normal part of the Western lifestyle, we live extremely stressful lives from jobs that take too much time and too much of a toll, to family commitments and obligations, to running households, volunteering, church activities, keeping in touch with friends...the to-do list of life never seems to end causing lots of additional stress each and every day! This external stress has a profound effect on our internal health especially in the process of creating and worsening Type 2 Diabetes. 

In people with diabetes, stress can alter blood glucose levels in two ways:
  • People under stress may not take good care of themselves. They may drink more alcohol or exercise less. They may forget, or not have time, to check their glucose levels or plan good meals.
  • Stress hormones may also alter blood glucose levels directly.
Scientists have studied the effects of stress on glucose levels in animals and people. Diabetic mice under physical or mental stress have elevated glucose levels. The effects in people with type 1 diabetes are more mixed. While most people's glucose levels go up with mental stress, others' glucose levels can go down. In people with type 2 diabetes, mental stress often raises blood glucose levels. Physical stress, such as illness or injury, causes higher blood glucose levels in people with either type of diabetes.
- See more at: http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/mental-health/stress.html#sthash.U4eiV14O.dpuf
In people with diabetes, stress specifically alters blood glucose levels. Stress does this in two ways:

1. Stress hormones which are naturally produced when we are under stress alter blood glucose levels directly.

2. When you are under stress you do not care for yourself as well as you would if you where not stressed, you do not eat as healthy and will often be drawn to or crave sweet substances and carbohydrates. Overall self-care goes down significantly when under stress and since Type 2 Diabetes is a lifestyle disease self-care is VITAL to prevention and healing. 

Scientists have studied the effects of stress on glucose levels in animals and people. Diabetic mice under physical or mental stress have elevated glucose levels. In people with type 2 diabetes, mental stress often raises blood glucose levels. Physical stress, such as illness or injury, causes higher blood glucose levels in people with either type of diabetes. (1)

How to Naturally Reduce Stress to Heal & Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Since we know there is little we can do about eliminating stress altogether, we must instead find healthy ways to reduce the effects of stress on our internal health. Healthy stress management practices can do just that. 

Yoga


Yoga is a mind-body practice of exercise and movement that combines stretching exercises, controlled breathing and relaxation. A number of studies have shown that yoga can help reduce overall stress while also enhancing mood and overall sense of well-being.

One three month study found that those with Type 2 Diabetes who engaged in a regualr yoga practice had a significant reduction in BMI and better glycemic control. They also found yoga to increase specific internal antioxidants which helped to reduce oxidative stress which has been linked as a root cause of Type 2 Diabetes. (2) Overall yoga had a significnalty positive effect on helping to heal and reduce the symsptoms associated with Type 2 diabetes

Meditation

Studies have shown that meditation not only reduces stress it also increases the efficiency of the immune system and helps facilitate quicker healing  overall in the body. Regardless of the disease you have, helping to support quicker and better healing in the body is imperative. meditation is one such tool which can help you to increase your healing rate. 

After just 3 weeks of meditative practice, one study found that blood glucose levels decreased in regular mediators as well as blood pressure. (3)

Deep Breathing Exercises

Deep breathing exercises can be beneficial to your health in so many ways. At the tops of that list is the ability to take time to release stress and also built up toxins. As our previous blog posts have talked about, Toxins have a direct link to the development and worsening of Type 2 Diabetes. We release up to 80% of our toxins from our body through our breath, the problem is most of us breathe too shallowly, especially during times of stress, which means more toxins stay trapped in the body. Deep breathing exercises help to release those built up toxins and also is a way for you to decrease and manage stress in a more healthy way. 




Now that you know some easy Healthy Stress Management tools the key is to implement them into your daily life. If you have no used these tools before they are not hard to begin, but consistency and making them long term habist can be the challenging part. 

Raw Vitality offers a way for you to learn how to eat and live in a way to Heal and Prevent Type 2 Diabetes in a supported environment over a 30-day period to ensure all the things you need to be doing to heal, become long term habits. 
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The Raw Vitality Naturally Healing Diabetes program is a 30-day program that teaches and guides you through the 4 keys to health. In 30-days you will gain the education and support you need to begin to heal your body and naturally reverse type 2 diabetes. This is an online program that offers you workbooks, recipe books, group wellness coaching calls, daily meditations, and unlimited support from the Raw Vitality team. 

Our next Naturally Healing Diabetes group will begin on Monday May 4, 2015. Register for this program today!

For any questions contact: therawvitalitycleanse@gmail.com


In people with diabetes, stress can alter blood glucose levels in two ways:
  • People under stress may not take good care of themselves. They may drink more alcohol or exercise less. They may forget, or not have time, to check their glucose levels or plan good meals.
  • Stress hormones may also alter blood glucose levels directly.
Scientists have studied the effects of stress on glucose levels in animals and people. Diabetic mice under physical or mental stress have elevated glucose levels. The effects in people with type 1 diabetes are more mixed. While most people's glucose levels go up with mental stress, others' glucose levels can go down. In people with type 2 diabetes, mental stress often raises blood glucose levels. Physical stress, such as illness or injury, causes higher blood glucose levels in people with either type of diabetes.
- See more at: http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/mental-health/stress.html#sthash.U4eiV14O.dpuf



References:

1. Does emotional stress cause type 2 diabetes mellitus? A review from the European Depression in Diabetes (EDID) Research Consortium.http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20193636

2. Effect of 3-Month Yoga on Oxidative Stress in Type 2 Diabetes With or Without Complications
http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/34/10/2208.full


3. Hypoglycemic effect of sitting breathing meditation exercise on type 2 diabetes
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18386551


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